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Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Rosemary Black Pepper No-Knead Artisan Bread

http://menumusings.blogspot.com
Isn't this a gorgeous loaf of bread?  To think that you can just mix this up, let it sit overnight, then bake it in a pot the next day with this beautiful result just blows my mind!

To the best of my knowledge, the originator of this recipe is Jim Lahey, owner of Sullivan St Bakery.  See more about him in Food Nerd Notes at the bottom of this post.  He figured out that you can use a heavy cast iron or cast enamel pot WITH a lid to recreate a bakers steam oven to give the bread this gorgeous crust.  What a GENIUS! 

So here is my experience making this bread.  (I have added some extra stuff to my loaf.)  You can CERTAINLY make it plain or add your favorite ingredients to it.

Ingredients:
  • 3 cups all purpose flour
  • 1½ cups water
  • ¼ teaspoon yeast
  • 1¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • oil (for coating)
  • extra flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal (for dusting)
  • 1 cup gruyere cheese, grated
  • zest of 1 large lemon
  • fresh chopped rosemary (about 2 Tbsp)
  • 1/2 tsp cracked black pepper

Step-by-Step:
Mix all of the dry ingredients in a medium bowl.

3 cups flour
1 1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp yeast
Here is where you start being creative!


Have you ever seen such a cute grater?!

1 cup gruyere cheese

zest of one lemon
Mix to incorporate.


1/2 tsp cracked black pepper

About 2 tsp fresh rosemary, chopped
Add water and incorporate with a wooden spoon for 30 seconds to 1 minute.
1 1/2 cups warm water

You dough will be a "shaggy" sticky mess.  It is supposed to be!
Lightly coat the inside of a second medium bowl with oil and place the dough in the bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest 12-18 hours at room temperature (approx. 65-72°F).

Tip - use a marker to write the beginning and ending time on top of the plastic wrap. 
Remove the dough from the bowl and fold once or twice.

Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the bowl or on the work surface.
Next, shape the dough into ball. Generously coat a cotton towel with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal; place the dough seam side down on the towel and dust with flour.

Cover the dough with a cotton towel (not terrycloth) and let rise 1-2 hours at room temperature, until more than doubled in size.
Preheat oven to 450-500°F. Place the pot in the oven with the lid at least 30 minutes prior to baking to preheat. 

Once the dough has more than doubled in volume, remove the pot from the oven and place the dough in the pot seam side up.  Careful - the pot is now 450 degrees F!!!
You will probably hear it sizzle when you put it in there.  The pot does NOT need to be oiled in any way.  Don't worry.  It won't stick to the pot.  It will be like baking it on a preheated baking stone.
Cover with the lid and bake 30 minutes.
The pot actually becomes its own oven, and that oven has plenty of steam in it.  Don't open the lid once you put it on.
Then remove the lid and bake 15-30 minutes uncovered, until the loaf is nicely browned.




Food Nerd Notes:
This is an excerpt from the Minimalist, in the 2006 NY Times:

Mr. Lahey’s method is striking on several levels. It requires no kneading. (Repeat: none.) It uses no special ingredients, equipment or techniques. It takes very little effort.

It accomplishes all of this by combining a number of unusual though not unheard of features. Most notable is that you’ll need about 24 hours to create a loaf; time does almost all the work. Mr. Lahey’s dough uses very little yeast, a quarter teaspoon (you almost never see a recipe with less than a teaspoon), and he compensates for this tiny amount by fermenting the dough very slowly. He mixes a very wet dough, about 42 percent water, which is at the extreme high end of the range that professional bakers use to create crisp crust and large, well-structured crumb, both of which are evident in this loaf.

The dough is so sticky that you couldn’t knead it if you wanted to. It is mixed in less than a minute, then sits in a covered bowl, undisturbed, for about 18 hours. It is then turned out onto a board for 15 minutes, quickly shaped (I mean in 30 seconds), and allowed to rise again, for a couple of hours. Then it’s baked. That’s it.

The long, slow rise does over hours what intensive kneading does in minutes: it brings the gluten molecules into side-by-side alignment to maximize their opportunity to bind to each other and produce a strong, elastic network. The wetness of the dough is an important piece of this because the gluten molecules are more mobile in a high proportion of water, and so can move into alignment easier and faster than if the dough were stiff.”


And, as Mr. Lahey himself notes, “The Egyptians mixed their batches of dough with a hoe.”

Want more bread recipes from this blog? 
Some of these are more involved, others are just mix-dump-bake recipes!
Order the Menu Musings Cookbook! 
 
P.S.  As I write this, here is our newest batch of bread with dried cranberries and orange zest!!  I can't wait to try it!
Written Directions
Mix all of the dry ingredients in a medium bowl. Add water and incorporate with a wooden spoon for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Lightly coat the inside of a second medium bowl with oil and place the dough in the bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest 12-18 hours at room temperature (approx. 65-72°F).

Remove the dough from the bowl and fold once or twice. Let the dough rest 15 minutes in the bowl or on the work surface. Next, shape the dough into ball. Generously coat a cotton towel with flour, wheat bran, or cornmeal; place the dough seam side down on the towel and dust with flour. Cover the dough with a cotton towel (not terrycloth) and let rise 1-2 hours at room temperature, until more than doubled in size.

Preheat oven to 450-500°F. Place the pot in the oven with the lid at least 30 minutes prior to baking to preheat. Once the dough has more than doubled in volume, remove the pot from the oven and place the dough in the pot seam side up. Cover with the lid and bake 30 minutes Then remove the lid and bake 15-30 minutes uncovered, until the loaf is nicely browned.

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12 comments:

  1. I relly must try this. How did it slice?

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    1. The outer crust was thick and crusty, yet is does NOT crumble when you cut it... stayed chewy. And the inside had a beautiful crumb - made even better with the flecks of pepper and rosemary.

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  2. Can you use a metal pot or a crock pot? I do not have an enamel dutch oven =(

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    Replies
    1. I will be totally honest and say I don't know. I think the most important part is that the pot is "heavy" and has a tight fitting lid. The whole point is to create a sort of "steam oven" out of the pot/lid. All that said... It's a minimal amount of effort and money wasted if it doesn't work, right? We'll never know unless someone tries! I hope you'll volunteer for it and let us all know how it goes. I betcha there are more people who have the same question!

      Julie

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    2. I wouldn't suggest using a 'regular' pot -- you can use a cast iron pot if you don't have an enamel one. You should also check out a book "Artisan Bread in 5 minutes a Day" for some other recipes with a similar idea -- absolutely no kneading, and you mix enough dough for several loaves and store in the 'frig for several weeks. You can bake on a stone, or an overturned baking sheet.

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    3. Thanks for the advice. I've only tried it in a cast enamel pot. ...and thanks for the book reference. This recipe has come out great every time I've made it, so it's great to be able to access more that are similar!!
      Julie

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  3. just made first loaf in a cast iron dutch oven and it turned out great. I used 1 and a half cups of whole wheat flour and 1 and a half white flour then added 1Tbls. of caraway seeds.Top that with a piece of good sharp cheddar cheese after it is done and enjoy.

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  4. Any ideas how to make this beautiful loaf without the cheese? I'd love to try it but can't have dairy (food allergy) and this does look scrumptious.

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    Replies
    1. Just use your favorite herbs, or a blend of herbs. The cheese is nonessential the baking process. The ones I did with cranberries and orange zest had a beautiful texture. - and I bet herbs and pieces of bacon would be fabulous!

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  5. Are you supposed to put the pot back in the oven once it has been heated or are you supposed to use the pot as an oven itself? I've never been good with bread recipes.

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    Replies
    1. Yep - everything goes back into the oven!

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  6. I would like to recommend making a parchment cradle and dropping it with the bread in it into the Dutch oven or pot. This makes it easier to remove the bread once it is done. The Dutch ovens take a while to cool and this way the bread can cool independent of the oven. I love "no knead" bread has changed the way I bake.

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