Monday, September 30, 2013

Gorgonzola Cream Sauce for Your Steaks

I happen to LOVE blue cheese on my steak.  This creamy Gorgonzola sauce gives me just the right amount of "bite" from the blue cheese, yet is toned down with the creamy goodness and fresh herbs.  It's an easy sauce to make, and dresses up your steak into something special!  I used it on a beef filet, but you can use this on your favorite cut of steak.

Click for Printable Recipe

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 3/4 tsp black pepper
  • 3 Tbsp freshly grated Parmigiano reggiano
  • 2 Tbsp freshly chopped parsley + extra for plating
  • 1/3 cup crumbly Gorgonzola + extra for plating
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt (not table salt)








Step-by-Step: 
Carefully bring the cream to a boil, then reduce heat to medium low.   Do not take your eyes off of this cream as you are bringing it to a boil.  It will boil over the instant you do!  LOL
2 cups heavy cream

Add the other ingredients and cook until thickened and reduced. That's it!
3/4 tsp black pepper
3 Tbsp freshly grated Parmigiano reggiano

2 Tbsp freshly chopped parsle

1/3 cup crumbly Gorgonzola + extra for plating

I waited to add the salt until last, because some blue cheese's can be very salty.
1/4 tsp kosher salt (not table salt)


For the beef filet - 

Allow filets to come to room temperature.  Season steaks well with seasoning blend of your choice.  I used Montreal Steak Seasoning.  
Steaks of your choice.  These are filets.
I added a couple of Tbsp of extra virgin olive oil to my grill pan.

On a very hot grill pan, sear 1 minute, turn 90 degrees and sear an additional 2 minutes. 
Flip and sear side two for 2 minutes, turn 90 degrees and sear an additional 2 minutes.  This gave me the medium I was looking for.  Adjust times according to your preference of doneness.  I recommend a digital, instant read thermometer to take the guesswork out of it, but there are some little tricks some people use to test for doneness. *Read about the "face test" at the bottom of the post.  I did not make this up.  I read it somewhere.  It seems sorta cool, so I'm passing it along in case this method appeals to any of you.
I cooked to medium (160 degrees F *according to the USDA guidelines) before resting 5 minutes.  This was about 7 minutes for my steaks, but this will depend on the thickness of your filets.  (These were about 1 1/4" thick each.)   If you like them more well done, just cook them longer.  Just know that the meat will not be as tender.  This post is really about the sauce.
 

Did you enjoy this recipe?  I hope so!
Visit my Recipe Index for tons more recipes ideas to cook with/for your family!
To become part of the "family," please Click here to subscribe to MenuMusings... and remember, you can also connect with me on the MenuMusings Facebook Page. 

Order the Menu Musings Cookbook!
 
As always, here are some "bonus" recipes for you:
Grilled Zucchini Rolls 
 
Stuffed Peppers

Vietnamese-Style Lettuce Cups

Black Pepper and Gruyere Popovers

Andouille Breakfast Potatoes

Spinach Artichoke Dip-Stuffed Chicken Breasts

Written Method: 
Carefully bring the cream to a boil, then reduce heat to medium low.  Add the other ingredients and cook until thickened and reduced. That's it!

For the beef filet - 
I cooked to medium (160 degrees F *according to the USDA guidelines) before resting 5 minutes.  This was about 7 minutes for my steaks, but this will depend on the thickness of your filets.  (These were about 1 1/4" thick each.)  Allow filets to come to room temperature.  Season steaks well with seasoning blend of your choice.  I used Montreal Steak Seasoning.  On a very hot grill pan, sear 1 minute, turn 90 degrees and sear an additional 2 minutes.  Flip and sear side two for 2 minutes, turn 90 degrees and sear an additional 2 minutes.  This gave me the medium I was looking for.  Adjust times according to your preference of doneness.  I recommend a digital, instant read thermometer to take the guesswork out of it, but there are some little tricks some people use to test for doneness. *Read about the "face test" at the bottom of the post.  I did not make this up.  I read it somewhere.  It seems sorta cool, so I'm passing it along in case this method appeals to any of you.

Steak Doneness:  (This is from the Steak Enthusiast.) 
Here’s how you learn the various levels of doneness:

With a poker face — no smiling or you’ll be eating beef jerky — touch your cheek. That’s how rare meat feels. Offering no resistance when pressed, it has a red center but should be warm all the way through. Touch your chin. This is the feel of medium rare. The color should be bright pink to red when cut.  Now, touch the end of your nose. This will coincide with the texture of medium doneness. It has a pink center. The area just above the bridge of your nose on your forehead is the tactile equivalent of medium-well. It has a thin line of pink remaining in the center. The bottom of your shoe is well done.

Winn-Dixie Executive Chef Robert Tulko prefers gauging doneness using touch also, but with his fist:

First, make a relaxed fist, he said. The web of your hand between the thumb and forefinger on top feels like rare meat. If you slightly clench your fist, that same v-section of your hand is now medium. Clench your fist tightly, and the area will now feel like well done — hard, and in my opinion, inedible.
Tulko explained that as meats cook, the juices are drawn to the upper surface. That’s why when you cut into a steak, the juices rush out.  He said you should let the steak rest for five to 10 minutes before serving and cutting. The juices will have time to settle back to the center.

2 comments:

  1. This looks amazing - I LOVE blue cheese, especially with steak!!

    ReplyDelete

Follow me on Pinterest

Follow Me on Pinterest

In-Article Adsense